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Why do I need a knee replacement?

Over time, the surfaces on the knee joint can start to wear. This can be caused by arthritis (a group of conditions that cause damage to one or more joints) or a previous injury to the knee.

Arthritis is painful as joints become stiff and inflamed when the smooth lining between the joints gets damaged or wears away. Without the protection of this lining, the rough surfaces of your bones rub together as you move, causing the pain that is all too common to sufferers.

Simple everyday things like going for a walk or even getting dressed become difficult. There’s no cure for arthritis and it can get worse with time. However joints can be replaced successfully, improving mobility and reducing pain.

A knee replacement is a procedure to remove your damaged knee joint and replace it with an artificial one (a prosthesis or implant) – this is made out of metal, plastic or ceramic. Following surgery your knee should be much less painful and the joint should move more smoothly.

New advances in technology offer a greater range of implant types and sizes. Your Nuffield Health surgeon will choose the implant that best fits your body size and lifestyle. In some cases a CT scan or MRI scan of your knee may be used to create special guides that will help your surgeon accurately fit your prosthesis.

Paying for your knee replacement surgery

Did you know at Nuffield Health Hospital you can pay for your knee treatment, rather than waiting for treatment on the NHS? Find out more about paying for yourself >

What happens during knee replacement surgery?

  • A knee replacement is normally performed under general anaesthetic
  • During the operation your whole existing knee joint is replaced with a new prosthetic knee joint
  • This takes between one and two hours
  • Your surgeon will make an incision (cut) at the front of your knee where the replacement will be inserted
  • Usually, you will stay in hospital for 2-4  days, but you may have to stay longer if necessary.

After your knee replacement operation

  • Once your operation is over, you’ll be taken to the recovery room where you will wake from the anaesthetic
  • Your wound, blood pressure and pulse will be checked carefully
  • You will have a large dressing covering your wound
  • You may have a small tube coming out of your wound - this is to drain away any excess fluid from the inside of the wound
  • You may also have a drip (infusion) going into your arm
  • This will keep you hydrated until you are able to drink, and can also be used to give you pain relief
  • When you are stable and comfortable, a nurse will take you back to your room.

Getting up for the first time

  • We understand that you may be anxious about getting up, but we will do all we can to help and reassure you
  • A member of our team will be there to help you, whenever you are ready
  • The reason for getting you moving is to improve your circulation and avoid stiffness
  • You may be feeling tender and sore, but you can get pain relief medication to deal with any discomfort – just ask one of the nurses if you have any pain
  • Once out of bed, you will continue to wear support stockings to help your circulation
  • The physiotherapists will work with you during your stay to help give you the best start with your new joint.

Going home after knee placement

  • Before discharge you will have an X-ray of your new knee to check its position
  • A physiotherapist will give you some exercises to help get your new knee moving
  • Exercise is important to help you make a good recovery
  • A physiotherapist will also show you how to walk up and down stairs and make sure you are confident at doing this before you go home
  • You won’t be able to drive, so you will need someone to come and take you home from the hospital
  • When you go home, you may need some help with shopping and household chores
  • It’s a good idea to arrange for someone to stay with you - or at least look in on you daily for at least a week
  • It’s usual to return to see your consultant as an outpatient after your operation
  • You may also need to have stitches removed
  • You’ll be given information about these appointments before you go home
  • We’ll also give you some pain relief medication to take with you
  • When you get home you will be tired for several weeks and should rest
  • However, it’s also important to gradually increase your physical activity each day, so you should continue with the exercises the physiotherapist showed you
  • These will help to reduce stiffness and strengthen your legs
  • You will need to keep using crutches or a walking stick for a while
  • To help you manage and increase mobility it’s recommended that you take any pain relief medication we have prescribed
  • So you don’t damage your new knee and to help your wound heal, you should use the shower instead of the bath
  • Keep wearing your support stockings - you may have to do so for four to six weeks.

Getting back to normal

  • Everyone heals differently. You will continue to improve over the next six to twelve months
  • Your scar should fade to a thin white line
  • Depending on what type of job you do, you should be able to return to work within twelve weeks
  • You may want to think about a phased return to work
  • After your follow-up visit with your surgeon you should be released to drive, but only if you can comfortably operate the pedals and control your car in all situations
  • If you are in any doubt about your insurance cover, it’s best to contact your insurance company.

Most people make a good recovery and return to normal activities following knee replacement. As with any surgery there can be complications:

  • Pain
  • Bleeding
  • Infection of the surgical site (incision)
  • Scarring
  • Blood clots (DVT - deep vein thrombosis)
  • Difficulty passing urine
  • Chest infection
  • Heart attack
  • Stroke.

Risks specific to knee replacement surgery are:

  • Numbness on the outside of the knee caused by a nerve being cut during surgery
  • Stiffness - there may need to be further, minor surgery to improve this
  • Pain when kneeling
  • Bleeding around the joint - this usually settles but may need to be drained by a surgeon
  • Fluid build-up around the joint
  • Rejection of the prosthesis
  • Infection in the joint.
Find your nearest hospital that provides this treatment

67 Lansdowne Road
Bournemouth
BH1 1RW

01202 291866

Shenfield Road
Brentwood
CM15 8EH

01277 695695

Warren Road
Brighton
BN2 6DX

01273 624488

3 Clifton Hill
Clifton
Bristol
BS8 1BN

0117 906 4870

4 Trumpington Road
Cambridge
CB2 8AF

01223 303336

Cardiff Bay Hospital
Dunleavey Drive
Cardiff
CF11 0SN

02920 836700

Hatherley Lane
Cheltenham
GL51 6SY

01242 246552

Wrexham Road
Chester
CH4 7QP

01244 680 444

78 Broyle Road
Chichester
PO19 6WB

01243 530600

Rykneld Road
Derby
DE23 4SN

01332 540100

Wonford Road
Exeter
EX2 4UG

01392 262110

25 Beaconsfield Road
Glasgow
G12 0PJ

01413349441

Stirling Road
Guildford
GU2 7RF

01483 555805

Burrell Road
Haywards Heath
RH16 1UD

01444 456999

Venns Lane
Hereford
HR1 1DF

01432 355 131

Foxhall Road
Ipswich
IP4 5SW

01473 279100

2 Leighton Street
Leeds
LS1 3EB

01133 882 067

Scraptoft Lane
Leicester
LE5 1HY

0116 2769 401

Clayton Road
Newcastle-upon-Tyne
NE2 1JP

0191 281 6131

Clayton Road
Newcastle-under-Lyme
ST5 4DB

01782 625431

Beech Road
Headington
Oxford
OX3 7RP

01865 307777

Derriford Road
Plymouth
PL6 8BG

01752 775861

Longden Road
Shrewsbury
SY3 9DP

01743 282628

Staplegrove Elm
Taunton
TA2 6AN

01823 286991

Junction Road
Norton
Stockton on Tees
TS20 1PX

01642 367439

Kingswood Road
Tunbridge Wells
TN2 4UL

01892 531111

The Chase
Old Milverton Lane
Leamington Spa
CV32 6RW

01926 436351

Winchester Road
Chandlers Ford
Eastleigh
SO53 2DW

02380 266 377

Shores Road
Woking
GU21 4BY

01483 227800

Wood Road
Tettenhall
Wolverhampton
WV6 8LE

01902 754 177

Haxby Road
York
YO31 8TA

01904 715000

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