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Cheltenham Hospital

Hatherley Lane, Cheltenham, GL51 6SY

01242 246552 01242 246501 (fax)
Main Reception 01242 246500
Enquiries, Treatments & Prices 01242 246552
Physiotherapy 03450454845
Radiology 01242 246 502

Why choose Nuffield Health Cheltenham Hospital for your orchidectomy procedure?

If you have been diagnosed with testicular cancer or have experienced a severe injury or infection in your testicles, you can get rapid access to an orchidectomy (testicle removal surgery) at Nuffield Health Cheltenham Hospital.

Our experienced urologists are renowned for their expertise and professionalism performing orchidectomy, regularly achieving their patients desired results from surgery. At Nuffield Health Cheltenham Hospital you can rely on our consultants, nursing team and hospital staff to provide you with a relaxing hospital environment, where privacy and patient confidentiality are paramount.

If you would like more information about orchidectomy or any other men's health treatment, come along to one of our free men's health open events at our hospital in Cheltenham. Here you will get the opportunity to meet a urological surgeon and ask any underlying questions you have about the procedure you are interested in.

How to book a consultation at Nuffield Health Cheltenham Hospital

If you are considering an orchidectomy, you will need to have a private consultation before proceeding with any treatment. Call our dedicated hospital enquiry team in Cheltenham today on 01242 809 622, alternatively fill out a contact form and we will find you an appointment time that works for you.

What happens during an orchidectomy at Nuffield Health Cheltenham Hospital?

  • An orchidectomy is usually performed under general anaesthetic and takes about 30 minutes
  • Your surgeon will make an incision (cut) in your scrotum or groin
  • They will remove your testicle(s) and close any wounds with dissolvable stitch
  • You may have the option of having prosthesis (fake testicle) inserted during your procedure
  • Be sure and discuss this with your surgeon
  • Immediately following surgery you will be taken to a recovery area
  • Nurses will monitor your blood pressure and pulse until you are fully awake. You will then be taken to a ward.

After your orchidectomy procedure in Cheltenham

  • We will give you pain relief medication. Be sure and let us know if you are still in any pain or discomfort. You may be given antibiotics to prevent infection
  • Some patients can go home the evening after their surgery, however you may need to spend one night in hospital
  • Be sure and arrange for someone to drive you home on your day of discharge. Continue to take any pain relief medication
  • You will be able to take a daily shower but should avoid a bath until your wound is fully healed
  • It is normal to experience swelling and bruising for the first few weeks after surgery. Wearing a scrotal support or a firm pair of underpants should ease some discomfort
  • If you experience any increase in redness about your wound or your wound begins to leak please telephone a member of our healthcare team
  • You should avoid any heavy lifting, riding a bicycle and active sports activities for 2-4 weeks after your procedure.  Be sure and discuss any return to work and when you can resume driving with your consultant
  • If you have been diagnosed with a tumour you may need to return to hospital for follow-up scans, blood tests or further treatment
  • Your consultant will advise if this is necessary in your first post-surgery review appointment.

As with any surgical procedure there could be complications including:

  • Pain
  • Bleeding
  • Reaction to general anaesthetic
  • Infection.

Specific complications of an orchidectomy may include:

  • Swelling and bruising
  • Change is body appearance
  • Continued scrotal pain
  • Need for further treatment.

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