Top tips for healthier snacking

Zoe Rowlandson Nutritional Therapist More by this author
Living the busy lives that we do it can be hard to keep track of the food that we eat. Snacking is a quick fix for when we’re on the go and can be a good way to maintain our blood sugar levels, but it can also lead to unhealthy eating and weight gain.

Nutritionist Zoe Rowlandson offers some top tips to take control of your snacking for a healthier you.

1. Don’t skip meals 

When you skip meals your blood sugar drops and your body begins to crave sugar, sending you on the hunt for the nearest source. This can lead to snacking from vending machines, the cookie jar or other unhealthy sources.

2. Know your danger zones

Get in tune with your own body and recognise what your triggers are. Does stress or tiredness cause you to eat? Be mindful about what causes you to snack, this will allow you to challenge your own behaviours.

3. Be prepared

Stocking your fridge, freezer and cupboards with healthy alternatives will allow you to be prepared when you do need a snack to perk you up. Freeze watermelons and bananas as great alternatives to ice lollies. Buy raisins and nuts in place of chocolate biscuits

4. Use protein to fill you up

Nuts and seeds are a good source of protein, which helps you to feel full throughout the day. Around 30g is a good amount to keep you full between meals – equivalent to a small palmful.

5. Schedule meals 

Constant grazing is not a great idea as it’s hard to keep track of how much food you are taking in. Try to schedule your day to eat every 3 or 4 hours.

Wednesday 27 May 2015

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