Contact our Leeds Hospital today:

Fill in the form below, or give us a call.

Thank you

A member of the team will respond to you soon.

To continue to receive communications from Nuffield Health about our exclusive offers, products and services, then please tell us how you'd like to be contacted by ticking the relevant boxes below:

On occasion Nuffield Health may contact you with pertinent service information in regards to services we provide. Note that you can either amend or withdraw your consent at any time.

For information about where your personal data may be processed, how it may be processed and for details of our Data Protection Officer, please see our Privacy Policy.

Leeds Hospital

2 Leighton Street, Leeds, LS1 3EB

0113 388 2111 0113 301 0245 (fax)
Switchboard 0113 388 2000
Treatment Enquiries 0113 388 2111
Outpatient Bookings 0113 388 2067

These include:

  • A family history
  • Being overweight
  • Living a sedentary lifestyle
  • High cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Stress

In addition, you might just need reassurance that there is no cardiovascular risk to your health.

Cardiovascular tests involve a thorough analysis of haematology and blood chemistry, together with a number of additional tests which have been shown to be predictors of cardiovascular disease. Although blood cholesterol levels have some predictive value, in over 30% of patients experiencing a cardiovascular event, cholesterol levels have been normal.

Additional tests to supplement the standard screen include:

  • Homocysteine is an amino acid your body uses to make protein and to build and maintain tissue. Excessive levels in your blood may increase your risk of stroke, certain types of heart disease, and disease of the blood vessels of the arms, legs and feet (peripheral artery disease).
  • NT pro B NP is made in the heart and is associated with sodium control in heart muscle. NT pro B NP has been shown to be a predictor of heart failure. Levels can be measured to rule out risk of a heart failure.
  • Lipoprotein (a) is an independent risk factor for stroke and coronary heart disease. The Lp(a) test is used to identify the presence of Lp(a) as a possible risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Your Lp(a) level is genetically determined (meaning you are born with level) and remains relatively constant over  your  lifetime. Since it is usually not affected by lifestyle changes or by most drugs, it is not the target of therapy. Instead, when Lp(a) is high, the presence of this added risk factor may suggest the need for more aggressive treatment of other, more treatable risk factors.