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Oxford, The Manor Hospital

Beech Road, Headington, Oxford, OX3 7RP

01865 307777
Reception and all general enquiries 01865 307777
New treatment enquiries 01865 307750
Diagnostic Imaging (appointments and enquiries) 01865 307 437
Nurses' Station (for inpatients only) 01865 307 579
Physiotherapy (appointments only) 0333 305 7905
Physiotherapy (enquiries) 01865 307 533
Accounts 01865 987 653

Benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous) tumours can occur as a result of abnormal cell growth in the lining of your bladder. You may experience blood in your urine (haematuria) or discomfort when you pass urine. You may also feel the need to pass urine often. To ease any symptoms and ensure a correct diagnosis your consultant may recommend a resection (or scraping) of your bladder.

What happens during transurethral resection of a bladder tumour?

TURBT is usually performed under general or spinal anaesthetic and usually takes about 30 minutes.

Your consultant will pass a tiny telescope call a resectoscope into your bladder via your urethra (the tube that carries urine from your bladder). They can then examine your bladder lining and locate any abnormal growth. Any areas identified will be scrapped and removed from your bladder. Any exposed or raw areas will be sealed using cauterisation (electric current). Sometimes samples of the growth are taken so they can be analysed in a lab. After removing the resectoscope your consultant will place a catheter (tube) in your bladder to help you pass urine easily and wash out your bladder with fluid.

Additional treatment may be recommended depending on the lab analysis.

Immediately following your procedure you will be taken to a recovery area. Once the effects of any anaesthetic have worn off you will be taken to a ward.

You will not be able to leave hospital until the catheter is removed you can pass urine on your own. This may be 1-2 days. You may be prescribed antibiotics to help prevent infection.

Going home after TURBT

You will not be able to drive so please be sure and arrange for someone to take you home when you are discharged.

To prevent blood clots follow the instructions from out healthcare team on medication or special compression stockings.

You may experience a stinging sensation when you pass urine in the first few days. You may also see blood in your urine. This should clear in a few days. Drink plenty of water to help flush your bladder. Avoid any strenuous activity for about one week. Discuss any return to work with your consultant.

As with any surgical procedure there could be complications including:

  • Pain
  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Reaction to anaesthetic
  • Blood clots (deep vein thrombosis – DVT)

Specific complications of TURBT: