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Guildford Hospital

Stirling Road, Guildford, GU2 7RF

01483 555805
General Enquiries 01483 555 805

Why choose Nuffield Health Guildford Hospital for your ACL repair surgery?

At Nuffield Health Guildford Hospital, we pride ourselves on our consistently high standards of clinical care. By choosing to have your orthopaedic surgery with us, you can rest assured that you will be in the best hands when it comes to your ACL knee repair surgery. Our experienced orthopaedic surgeons are experts in their field and regularly achieve high level outcomes from ACL reconstruction.

If you are unsure about the benefits of this knee surgery or whether it's right for you, feel free to attend one of our free orthopaedic open events. Here you will get the chance to meet one of our consultants in person and ask any questions you may have.

We believe that the recovery period is just as important as the procedure itself when it comes to achieving successful outcomes. As a knee surgery patient with us, you will be eligible for our exclusive Recovery Plus Programme at your local Fitness & Wellbeing Gym. Here you will get the chance to work through your rehabilitation with one of our qualified physiotherapists, who will help to ensure a full and thorough recovery.

What is the anterior cruciate ligament?

The anterior cruciate ligament (often referred to as 'ACL') is one of the important ligaments that stabilise your knee joint. If you have torn (ruptured) this ligament, the knee can collapse or ‘give way’ when making twisting or turning movements. This injury is common in high level sport like professional football and used to spell the end of an individuals career, but due to medical advancements this is no longer the case.

How does an ACL rupture happen?

An ACL rupture happens as a result of a twisting injury to the knee. The common causes are football and skiing injuries. You can injure other parts of your knee at the same time, such as tearing a cartilage or damaging the joint surface.

What happens during ACL reconstruction at Nuffield Health Guildford Hospital?

  • ACL reconstruction is normally performed under general anaesthetic
  • The operation usually takes between 1 and 1.5 hours
  • Your surgeon will make one or more cuts on the front and sides of your knee
  • Some surgeons perform the operation by arthroscopy (‘keyhole’ surgery) using a camera to see inside the knee joint
  • Your surgeon will replace the ACL with a piece of suitable tissue (a graft) from elsewhere in the body
  • The top and bottom ends of the replacement ligament are fixed with special screws or anchors into ‘tunnels’ drilled in the bone.

How soon will I recover?

  • You should be able to go home the same day or the day after
  • Your surgeon may want you to wear a knee brace for a few weeks after the operation
  • Once your knee is settling down you will need to start regular physiotherapy treatment that may continue for as long as 6 months
  • Complete recovery can take up to 9 months
  • Most people make a good recovery and return to normal activities following ACL reconstruction. As with any surgery there can be complications.

General complications of any surgical procedure:

  • Pain
  • Bleeding
  • Infection in the surgical wound
  • Unsightly scarring
  • Blood Clots
  • Difficulty passing urine.

Specific complications of ACL reconstruction:

  • Break of the kneecap
  • Damage to nerves around the knee
  • Infection in the knee joint
  • Discomfort in the front of the knee
  • Loss of knee movement
  • Recurrent giving way of the knee
  • Severe pain, stiffness and loss of use of the knee (Complex Regional Pain Syndrome).
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