• Overview

Or call us on

020 8971 8000
Overall rating Good

An orchidectomy is a surgical procedure to remove one or both testicles (bilateral orchidectomy).

What is an orchidectomy?

An orchidectomy, the removal of one or both testicles (bilateral orchidectomy), is usually performed if you have been diagnosed with a testicular tumour. This is because testosterone produced in the testicles can promote the growth of prostate and breast cancer. It is also performed if you have experienced an injury or infection in your testicle(s).

Transgender women may choose to have an orchidectomy as part of their transition from male to female.

What happens during an orchidectomy?

An orchidectomy is usually performed under general anaesthetic and takes about 30 minutes. Your surgeon will make an incision (cut) in your scrotum or groin. They will remove your testicle(s) and close any wounds with dissolvable stitches.

You may have the option of having prosthesis (fake testicle) inserted during your procedure. Be sure and discuss this with your surgeon.

Immediately following surgery you will be taken to a recovery area. Nurses will monitor your blood pressure and pulse until you are fully awake. You will then be taken to a ward.

Recovery from orchidectomy

We will give you pain relief medication. Let us know if you are still in any pain or discomfort. You may be given antibiotics to prevent infection.

Some patients can go home the evening after their surgery, however you may need to spend one night in hospital.

You will need to arrange for someone to drive you home on your day of discharge. You should continue to take any pain relief medication when you're home as prescribed.

You will be able to take a daily shower but should avoid a bath until your wound is fully healed.

It's normal to experience swelling and bruising for the first few weeks after surgery. Wearing a scrotal support or a firm pair of underpants should ease some discomfort.

If you experience any increase in redness about your wound or your wound begins to leak please call a member of our healthcare team.

You should avoid any heavy lifting, riding a bicycle and active sports activities for 2-4 weeks after your procedure. Please discuss your return to work and when you can resume driving with your consultant.

If you have been diagnosed with a tumour you may need to return to hospital for follow-up scans, blood tests or further treatment. Your consultant will advise if this is necessary in your first post-surgery review appointment.

Risks

Specific complications of an orchidectomy may include:

  • Swelling and bruising
  • Change is body appearance
  • Continued scrotal pain
  • Need for further treatment


Parkside Hospital

53 Parkside, Wimbledon, London, SW19 5NX

020 8971 8000
Switchboard 020 8971 8000
Outpatient appointments 0208 137 8431
Self-pay patients 0208 137 8432
NHS England Patients team 0208 971 1261
Private GP service 0208 137 8431
Admissions – for patients booked for surgery 020 8971 8012
Account enquiries 020 8605 2895
Diagnostics 0208 137 8459
Physiotherapy 0208 137 8431
Pathology 020 8971 8022
Finance – to pay a bill or invoice enquiries (Mon-Fri 9am-5pm) 020 8605 2895

Ways to pay

Nuffield Health promise

Our prices are all-inclusive. We will equal any comparable price. There are no time limits on your aftercare.

Paying for yourself

There are no hidden costs in our treatment prices. The price you see is the price you pay.

Find out more

Personal medical loan

Spread the cost of your treatment with a 6, 10 or 12 month 0% personal medical loan.

Find out more

Medical insurance

We work with you and your insurance provider to get you the treatment you need quickly

Find out more